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About Me

loudmaouth

Biography

Back in my prehistory, though predisposed towards creative subjects, I was guided into a BSc in chemistry –on the grounds that science offered a far more respectable career. I saw sense in my early twenties: undertaking an Art Foundation and subsequent BA in animation. After graduation I set up a small studio in Brighton, riding the wave of digital media which struck at that time. I began writing scripts, both animation and live-action and learnt about dialogue, character development, and narrative structure.

While at university, I began to write a fantasy roleplaying system as a form of escape. This has been a wonderful source of social entertainment over the years –something that allowed those that took part to really develop the characters they played; not as a game, but as a genuine on-going group story. The result from all this was that when I undertook my MA in Professional Writing at University College Falmouth, I found the creative ingredients were already there in my head waiting to be used.

I now work in Devon producing short films, digital graphics and visual effects for adverts. I’m also well known for my illustration work. And of course, I write.

Personal Trivia

 To deal with bullies at school I began learning squash, martial arts and archery. This allowed me to outrun them and defend myself if necessary. Fortunately the first two did the trick and I never had to shoot anyone.

I was part of the crew aboard the vessel that took line honours in the 1986 tall ships race.

My chemistry degree was a thesis degree, for which I worked under a Nobel Prize winning professor synthesising a molecule called buckminsterfullerine.

My first business wasn’t creative in any way: I worked as a motorcycle instructor to fund my animation degree.

I was responsible for the, often risqué, Mental Roy character in 3D World magazine, creating a new illustration each month.

Many people assumed that the white skunk streaks that appeared in my hair around my mid-twenties were a bleached affectation —no, that’s what stress does.